1-888-708-1629

Collaboration with Google Drive


Google Drive – My Little New Year’s Gift

Google DriveEach year as I return to my classroom from winter break, I look forward to several things. Reconnecting with colleagues, hearing stories from students and returning to my daily routine generally top the list. However, one more thing I look forward to is getting into my Google Drive.

Seeing what new ideas and materials one specific colleague has uploaded to our shared language arts department Google Drive part of our Google Apps for Education suite.  She is the colleague you just love to hate because on one hand, you can’t figure out where she finds the time to carry out so much, but you’re so glad she not only does the work, but shares it.

After each break, particularly winter and summer breaks, she has found or created a wealth of resources including everything from relevant research on best practices to useful graphic organizers or even entire units.

I look upon her shared documents as my annual New Year’s gift, each shared file a little present for me to open.

Creating Time

I feel as a teacher and hear from other teachers often that we just need more time. We need this time to work together, collaborate, and research and find great teaching materials. The one thing we rarely get, though, is more time. In these days of budget cuts, any extra time is taken up by our increased workloads — more essay papers to grade, more duties to take on, more federal and state mandates to meet.

So, rather than complain (too much), the language arts department at my school got creative. And it happened on accident.

This summer, we were fortunate to get one week of paid curriculum planning time through a National Writing Project grant. However, we had to work off site, which meant working without a printer. It was just us teachers, four laptops and an Internet connection developing a unit for a novel we all plan to teach this year. How would we ever share all the ideas, resources and materials we discovered?

Thankfully, our school district uses Google Apps for Education so we have access to a secure Google Drive folder. Inside this folder, we created subfolders for each aspect of the unit. In the end, we were able to share the folder with colleagues at another site in our school district. And, we continue to add materials as we each teach the unit and learn new techniques or come across new materials.

Exciting Possibilities

This dynamic experience with Google Drive this summer has me excited about the possibilities Google Drive holds.

A district wide committee I sit on uses Google Drive now to share research and to house our committee work. The reading intervention program our district uses is now utilizing Google Drive to share pictures and images for vocabulary word walls. My students are using Google Drive through their student Google accounts to share writing assignments with me (which I can grade without ever printing a single piece of paper).

Ending the Endless Search

As teachers at all levels become more comfortable with using Google Drive, it can become an avenue for teacher collaboration, becoming a repository of the best thinking and best practices of our district’s teachers.

Now, teachers often spend hours combing education websites looking for the perfect resource to fit their needs. This not only wastes time, but I often question the source, not knowing the teacher behind the worksheet, article or lesson plan. Or, lacking new resources, many of us continue to use outdated materials that no longer serve students needs.

Google Drive can become a more accessible network of teacher materials and ideas coming directly from our coworkers and colleagues we already trust. We won’t have to second-guess materials, but can rest assured they came from quality people.

The gift of a week to plan a curriculum with my colleagues was a rare luxury in today’s schools. However, I know I can receive little gifts from my colleagues throughout the year as we leverage the power of Google Drive to collaborate and learn from each other to better serve students.

Backup Google Apps Free for 30 Days

About Andrea Barnum Shunk

Andrea Barnum Shunk is a language arts teacher and reading intervention specialist
for at-risk high school students at a small, alternative high school in Portland,
Oregon. She has worked in education since 2002.

Before becoming a teacher, Andrea covered education for state and local
newspapers and worked in the district office of a Portland metro school district.

Andrea believes strongly in every student’s potential to learn, a potential only
the student can determine, not the teacher. She incorporates technology into her
teaching through student and teacher blogs, Google docs and online content. Her
instruction places an emphasis on media literacy, knowing the demands of the 21 st
century also demand citizens who can think critically about and engage with the
wealth of technological resources available.

Andrea has participated in several technology initiatives including incorporating
iPods into daily instruction, utilizing a web-based interactive teaching system, and
student Google accounts.

In addition to teaching, Andrea enjoys bike commuting in Oregon’s rainy weather,
backyard vegetable gardening and exploring the mountains with her husband and
two children.